Skip to content

Struggle of Illegal Immigration– Parallels Between U.S. and Ancient Rome: Lesson Learned, Unintended Consequence

agosto 9, 2015

  
Immigration is a hot issue today, many believe that illegal immigration is reaching such levels that it threatens national security, and perhaps even the national survival. Others believe that the country should give legal status to those who are already illegally in the country… According to kurtedwr; the U.S. has already done this once, in 1986; and the result was that millions more, seeing that there was hope for eventual legal status came illegally to the U.S. hoping for amnesty. We now have over three times more illegals in the U.S. than in 1986. Some say that if we continue to do this eventually we will reach a point, if we haven’t already, where there are so many illegals in the country that– they will not learn or adopt the U.S.’s– culture, traditions, laws, ethics, language… and they will never become Americans…
It happened before; just ask ancient Romans: Around the middle of 4th century AD, conditions outside boundaries of the Roman Empire became so bad that large numbers of people who were not citizens of the empire wanted entry for a better life… And just like in U.S. today, there were many ancient Romans, at that time, who believed that any kind of immigration (illegal or not) was good for the country and there were economic benefits that could be derived from allowing illegals to stay and settle in the country… Sound familiar: Isn’t that today’s U.S. story line; illegals are doing work Americans won’t do and the economy will suffer without their low-cost labor? The ancient Romans subsequently changed laws to give illegals legal status. Once illegals had legal status, other illegals wanted to enter the empire to gain legal status also. (sound familiar). It’s estimated that there are between 12 and 20 million illegals in the U. S., and under various proposals that are being considered by U.S. government, almost all of illegals will be given opportunity to gain legal status and eventual citizenship…

According to Heritage Foundation; over the next 20 years perhaps as many as 50 million illegals could gain legal status, if some of the current thinking prevails… And these illegals, too, have relatives who will want to come to the U. S. and, just as the illegals before them, many will also enter illegally… And should this migration of illegals continue it will have a profound impact on very ‘core’ of U.S. culture, traditions, laws, politics… But if we step back in time; there are lessons that can be learned from past great movement of illegals, for example; they overwhelmed the ancient Roman Empire, smothered its culture… The U.S. is now at a critical point; either effective action is taken or the country faces much greater issues later, such as the ancient Romans did…
However, there are no easy solutions for illegal immigration, for example; many immigration advocates say that it’s impossible for the U.S. to deport the many millions of illegals in the country, so just let them stay… But others say, that since illegals are here to work and make money, which many of them then send the money earned in the U.S. to families in their country of origin… so then their logic goes, if existing laws against the employment of illegals were enforced, the magnet of employment would disappear. And without the prospect of work many or most of the illegals would deport themselves… The presence of millions of people who have no regard for the U.S. culture, traditions… who speak little English, whose loyalties lie elsewhere is not a recipe for a healthy country. The prospect of taking action to legalize millions of illegals, which will attract tens of millions more is recipe for national suicide… If it seems far-fetched, remember; ancient Rome thought it was safe to legalize great numbers of illegal immigrants, and it was one of several factors for ancient Rome’s down fall…

In the article Illegal Immigration And Fall Of The Roman Empire by alpineski writes: The ancient Roman Empire demonstrated the veracity of the adage that– all empires fail for the same reason– in the end it costs more to maintain an empire than the empire can afford to pay… But is this adage shop-worn and of no real value in the modern world? And is disappearance of the ancient Roman Empire simply an obscure event from a long ago and irrelevant past? So, lets imagine a tourist traveling throughout the Roman Empire in the year 405 AD and they would have found it modestly prosperous and relatively peaceful. True, millions would have been living in abject poverty in an economy based on subsistence agriculture. The middle class would have been small and embattled with most of the wealth concentrated at the top of the social and economic pyramid, about 2%-3% of the population… Also, the tourist would have found that the most prominent and successful institution was the army, disciplined, well-trained and an altogether formidable fighting force… but then just fifty years later all this was gone…
One of the factors was illegal immigrants, they were equal to perhaps 10% of the native population… Not that illegals were rare and unusual, they had been seeping into the ancient Roman Empire for almost two hundred years, but what changed were the increasing large numbers… They crossed the Rhine River by the tens of thousands and kept coming… Historians say that the ancient Roman army was unable to stop them, and the native population did not seem to object, like we are seeing in the U.S. today… and there were indications that the illegals were even welcomed into the empire as workers… And, since the empire was sparsely populated it appeared that there was plenty of land to go around… So where does this leave U.S. and other western nations regarding illegal immigrants? I would say; it’s a bit of sticky wicket, I fear. However, modern western nations are stunningly wealthier now, and far more flexible than the brittle ancient Roman Empire; and yet, even here and now, there are limits…
During the past half century the costs of sustaining a developed nation has risen dramatically, while the ‘core’ of their productive economies, i.e., manufacturing… has transferred to the third world countries where labor costs are far less, and in a sense the U. S. and other western nations have been exporting their wealth to the third world and importing third world poverty… But more important, can national cohesion complicated by the importation of illegals, without genuine assimilation be maintained? Will native populations of western nations and the U. S.– as they watch their standard of living decline, and as new wealth is being generated by the system, which is being mostly concentrated at the top of the social and economic pyramid– be counted on to support the government? Will the middle class remain loyal to governments who renege on their long-standing promises for– better jobs, more opportunity, better life– in order to pay benefits to illegal immigrants who pay virtually nothing?

In the article Roman Empire: Gold Standard of Immigration by Cullen Murphy writes: There’s a widespread view that the Roman Empire was swept away mainly by a relentless tide of hostile outsiders; and we’ve all heard ugly references to the ‘barbarian hordes’ in today’s immigration debates. But truth is that ancient Rome was the world’s most successful multi-ethnic state and history’s longest lasting one, bar none… So it’s natural to wonder if ancient Romans might have something to teach the U.S. about the illegal immigration issue, and I’d argue that they do: One lesson is the notion of ‘taking control of the borders’ is overrated; borders were pliable then, and are even harder to define (or police) now. A second lesson is the importance of nurturing a national culture: It was the source of ancient Rome’s power, just as it’s the source of U. S’s…
Ancient Rome‘s ability to assimilate newcomers is so well-established that it’s easy to lose sight of it… But expansion of the Roman Empire to include tens of millions of non-Romans– and then absorption of the immigration of many more millions– was even a bigger phenomenon still… Military service integrated some illegals but ‘romanization’ occurred without the help of tools that U.S. takes for granted, such as; public schools, mass communications, even a single language (In the Roman Empire the elites spoke Latin and Greek, but the empire was polyglot.)… The historians observed what ancient Roman’s called ‘culture’ was in fact what kept the illegals in line…
The U.S. too, is an assimilation machine… Looking back, U.S. managed to accommodate the huge waves of immigration in 1850s, 1880s, first decade of the 1900s, and 1980s– despite skepticism at each of those moments that it ever could. Every age doubts that it can retain the absorptive capacity of ages past, just as every generation fails to remember the human heartache, wrenching adjustment of past immigration. In the end, the example of ancient Rome suggests that the most effective long-term stance toward illegals lies less in building walls, and more in strengthening the foundation of society– bolstering not just tangibles, such as; education, healthcare… but also intangible, such as; equality, principles of access and opportunity, entrepreneurial spirit… If we take care of these, much else will take care of itself…
In the article Laws Governing Immigration Don’t Work; When Not Enforced by John F. McManus writes: U.S. immigration legislation and policies just are not getting the job done… Many laws are being ignored, others are working contrary to their intent, and some that are not even laws (e.g., executive orders) have the effect of increasing large numbers of illegal border crossing. U.S. is country of immigrants and there is no doubt the rich history of immigration has contributed significantly to making the U.S. productive and strong… Nor can there be any assurance that past procedures were problem-free… But the penniless immigrants of years gone-by came into the U. S. legally. They got in line, secured qualified admittance, and eventually won citizenship… 

  
Allowing today’s millions of illegals to bypass the previous process for entry into the U. S. denigrate the worth of properly gained citizenship achieved by millions. But that is not the only issue; many of today’s illegals have found jobs, worked hard, obeyed laws… but, with little concern or understanding of the U.S.’s very foundation; its culture, its traditions, its laws… There are more than enough laws on the books to manage the illegal immigration crisis. What’s needed is the determination to– use them properly, humanely…
According to Edward Gibbon who wrote; ‘The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire’ said; emergence of a ‘welfare bread and circuses state’, and the great riches of ancient Rome became a big magnet for those looking for a better life… and the great numbers of illegals were a factor that ‘hollowed out’ the very core of ancient Roman Empire’s– culture, laws… and by the fifth century the empire was in free fall, and quickly disintegrating… A lesson to be learned from ancient Roman Empire’s illegal immigration issue is– in order for a country or empire to survive, prosper its population must understand and protect its ‘core’ principles– culture, loyalty, ethics, traditions… 

(http://bizshifts-trends.com/2014/11/26/struggle-illegal-immigration-parallels-u-s-ancient-rome-lesson-learned-unintended-consequence/)

Annunci
No comments yet

Rispondi

Inserisci i tuoi dati qui sotto o clicca su un'icona per effettuare l'accesso:

Logo WordPress.com

Stai commentando usando il tuo account WordPress.com. Chiudi sessione / Modifica )

Foto Twitter

Stai commentando usando il tuo account Twitter. Chiudi sessione / Modifica )

Foto di Facebook

Stai commentando usando il tuo account Facebook. Chiudi sessione / Modifica )

Google+ photo

Stai commentando usando il tuo account Google+. Chiudi sessione / Modifica )

Connessione a %s...

%d blogger hanno fatto clic su Mi Piace per questo: